Tag Archives: X100

Fuji X100 Firmware Version 1.20

It’s out there and it’s beautiful! Fuji X100 Firmware Version 1.20!

http://www.fujifilm.com/support/digital_cameras/software/firmware/x/finepix_x100/index.html

Autofocus faster!

RAW button can now be programmed (in addition to Fn button). I set it to ISO (I always shoot Raw anyway). Nice!

When Fn button is set to ND Filter, 1 press toggles state!! No need to make further selections after entering function.

What a beautiful camera! The ONE I have most enjoyed using, EVER!

I feel the X100 has re-kindled my flame for photography, my creativity and my joy. It’s once again a matter of ‘creating’ photos, not just ‘taking’ them. Don’t really know how to explain it logically.

Leave a comment

Filed under image, photo, photographer, photography, photojournalism, photos

Volunteer Work on ‘Good Deeds Day’ – Jerusalem

Female IDF soldier of the Shachar Battalion paints the hallways of old residential buildings on Stern Street in Kiryat Yovel on 'Good Deeds Day'. Jerusalem, Israel. 20-Mar-2012.

Boys of Al-Fak School in the Arab neighborhood of Tsur Baher decorate schoolyard on 'Good Deeds Day' as Municipality participates in a national project that encourages work for the community. Jerusalem, Israel. 20-Mar-2012.

Mayor Nir Barkat and businesswoman and philanthropist Shari Arison plant a tree in a community garden on Stern Street in Kiryat Yovel on ‘Good Deeds Day'. Jerusalem, Israel. 20-Mar-2012.

Leave a comment

Filed under art, documentary, image, israel, Jerusalem, photo, photographer, photography, photojournalism, photos

Deaf and Hearing Impaired Hear the Book of Esther – Jerusalem

Mayor Nir Barkat addresses the audience in a special Purim reading of the Book of Esther for the deaf and hearing-impaired at Bet Zusman using special amplifiers, visual projection and simultaneous sign language translation. Jerusalem, Israel. 8-Mar-2012.

 

Purim celebrators are viewed through the eyes of a mask as they assemble at Bet-Zusman for a special Purim reading of the Book of Esther for the deaf and hearing-impaired with special amplifiers, visual projection sign language translation. Jerusalem, Israel. 8-Mar-2012.

Mayor Nir Barkat takes part in a special Purim reading of the Book of Esther for the deaf and hearing-impaired at Bet Zusman, as special amplifiers are used, visual projection on screen and simultaneous sign language translation. Jerusalem, Israel. 8-Mar-2012.

Mayor Nir Barkat shakes the hand of a boy in a race car driver costume in a special Purim reading of the Book of Esther for the deaf and hearing-impaired at Bet Zusman using special amplifiers, visual projection and simultaneous sign language translation. Jerusalem, Israel. 8-Mar-2012.

1 Comment

Filed under art, documentary, image, israel, Jerusalem, photo, photographer, photography, photojournalism, photos

Purim Celebrations in Jerusalem

Purim, which commemorates the events described in the Book of Esther, mainly the foiling of the plot by anti-Semitic Haman, Grand Vizier of the Persian Empire, to massacre the Jews, is celebrated in carnivals and costumes.

A figure of Haman hangs ‘to death’ from an eighth story balcony, symbolizing Haman’s destiny as described in the Book of Esther, following his foiled attempt to massacre the Jews of Persia, as Purim is celebrated in the city. Jerusalem, Israel. 8-Mar-2012.

Excerpt from Government Press Office press release, 5-Mar-2012:

Purim commemorates the events described in the Book of Esther. In Esther 3:8, the anti-Semitic Haman, Grand Vizier of the Persian Empire, tells Persian King Ahasuerus that, “There is a certain people scattered abroad and dispersed among all the peoples… in your kingdom. Their laws are different from those of every people, neither do they keep the king’s laws. Therefore, it does the king no profit to suffer them. If it please the king, let it be written that they be destroyed…” Thus, Haman coined one of the most infamous anti-Semitic canards: That the Jews are a clannish and alien people who do not obey the laws of the land. At Haman’s contrivance, a decree is then issued for all Jews in the Persian Empire to be massacred. But, as the Book of Esther subsequently relates, Haman’s plot was foiled and, “The Jews had light and gladness, and joy and honor…a feast and a good day.” (8:16-17)

Purim, which commemorates the events described in the Book of Esther, mainly the foiling of the plot by anti-Semitic Haman, Grand Vizier of the Persian Empire, to massacre the Jews, is celebrated in carnivals and costumes. Jerusalem, Israel. 8-Mar-2012.

Throughout the centuries, Purim – which celebrates the miraculous salvation of the Jews and the thwarting of Haman’s genocidal plot – has traditionally symbolized the victory of the Jewish people over anti-Semitic tyranny. As such, Purim is a happy, carnival-like holiday.

After sunset Wednesday evening, 7 March, festive prayers will take place in synagogues, where the Book of Esther will also be read aloud. It is customary for people, especially children, to come to synagogue dressed in costume. During the reading of the Book of Esther, whenever Haman’s name is mentioned, congregants traditionally make as much noise as possible in order to drown out his name – a reflection of God’s promise (Exodus 17:14) to, “blot out,” the Amalekite nation, of which Haman was a descendant; special Purim noisemakers may be used for this purpose. The Book of Esther will be read again during morning prayers on Thursday, 8 March. A special Purim prayer is inserted into the daily prayers and the blessing after meals.

A boy wears a Smurf costume on Purim, celebrated as a happy, carnival-like holiday, commemorating the events described in the Book of Esther and the foiled plot of Haman, Grand Vizier of the Persian Empire, to massacre the Jews. Jerusalem, Israel. 8-Mar-2012.

On Purim, Jews are enjoined by the Book of Esther (9:22) to send gifts of food to each other, make special contributions to the poor, and have a festive holiday meal in the afternoon. To this end, the day is also marked by collections for various charities, and by people visiting neighbors and friends to deliver baskets of food, prominent among which are small, three-cornered, fruit-filled pastries known as Oznei Haman in Hebrew (Haman’s ears) or Hamantaschen in Yiddish (Haman’s pockets).

A young boy wears an IDF paratroopers costume on Purim, celebrated as a happy, carnival-like holiday, commemorating the events described in the Book of Esther and the foiled plot of Haman, Grand Vizier of the Persian Empire, to massacre the Jews. Jerusalem, Israel. 8-Mar-2012.

In Jerusalem, Purim is ordinarily celebrated one day later than it is in the rest of the world; accordingly, all Purim-related observances are postponed by one day. This practice originates from the fact that an extra day was prescribed for the Jews of Shushan (the modern Susa, one of the Persian Empire’s four capitals) to defend themselves against their enemies. This second day is known as Shushan Purim. As mentioned in the Book of Esther itself (9:16-19), Jews living in walled cities (later defined by rabbinical authorities to mean walled cities at the time that Joshua entered the Land of Israel) celebrate Purim one day later than Jews living in unwalled cities. There are several such cities in Israel where Shushan Purim is celebrated. In some cities whose status is in doubt, the Book of Esther will actually be read on both days.

Two IDF soldiers look up to a clown on stilts on Purim, celebrated as a happy, carnival-like holiday, commemorating the events described in the Book of Esther and the foiled plot of Haman, Grand Vizier of the Persian Empire, to massacre the Jews. Jerusalem, Israel. 8-Mar-2012.

Leave a comment

Filed under art, documentary, image, israel, Jerusalem, photo, photographer, photography, photojournalism, photos

Empowering Women on International Women’s Day

Posters of female neighborhood residents are displayed in the French Hill with their names and occupations on International Women’s’ Day defying a citywide wave of gender segregation in the public sphere imposed by religious pressure.

A poster of Dorit, a poet, is displayed in the French Hill on International Women’s Day defying a citywide wave of gender segregation in the public sphere imposed by religious pressure. Jerusalem, Israel. 8-Mar-2012.

In view of a citywide wave of gender segregation in the public sphere imposed by religious pressure and near-liquidation of advertisements including photos of women, this year’s International Women’s Day gets special meaning in Jerusalem. In the secular neighborhood of the French Hill a special campaign empowering women, residents of the neighborhood, puts twenty photos of women on display while giving them a name, an occupation and a meaningful identity. The posters also declare “Welcome to the French Hill!”

A poster of Sarit, a kindergarten teacher, is displayed in the French Hill on International Women’s Day defying a citywide wave of gender segregation in the public sphere imposed by religious pressure. Jerusalem, Israel. 8-Mar-2012.

The project was initiated by residents of the neighborhood themselves in an interest to make the neighborhood more attractive for secular young people. Photos were created voluntarily by a female photography major from Betzalel School of Art and graphic artists from the neighborhood also volunteered their services. Their message is “We are women and we are here to stay!”

A poster of Dalya, a rabbi, is displayed in the French Hill on International Women’s Day defying a citywide wave of gender segregation in the public sphere imposed by religious pressure. Jerusalem, Israel. 8-Mar-2012.

Leave a comment

Filed under art, documentary, image, israel, Jerusalem, photo, photographer, photography, photojournalism, photos

Ethiopians Are Losing Hope – Jerusalem

For 23 days Ethiopian Israelis have been occupying a protest tent outside the Prime Minister’s Residence in Jerusalem, demonstrating against what they consider paralyzing racism and discrimination against them in Israeli society. Jerusalem, Israel. 6-Mar-2012.

Shetu Yaacov (R), 31, opposite the PM’s residence at Ethiopian protest test in front of handwritten banner reading “the danger of racism is on the rise”. Jerusalem, Israel. 6-Mar-2012.

Shetu Yaacov, 31, born in the district of Gondar in Ethiopia, immigrated to Israel in 1990 at the age of nine. Shetu lives, just barely, in a rented apartment in Jerusalem. He is late with his monthly rent payments and will soon have no choice but to leave Jerusalem to find an apartment with lower rent elsewhere. Although he has a Bachelor’s Degree in Social Work and is currently employed by the Jerusalem Municipality indirectly, he cannot find a more stable job and must settle working through contractors on projects that deal solely with the Ethiopian community – he’s not wanted for anything else. Shetu believes it was his financial hardships that lead to his divorce. His ex-wife and one-year-old daughter have moved to his wife’s parents and he does his best to visit his daughter once every two weeks.

For 23 days Ethiopian Israelis have been occupying a protest tent outside the Prime Minister’s Residence in Jerusalem, demonstrating against what they consider paralyzing racism and discrimination against them in Israeli society. Jerusalem, Israel. 6-Mar-2012.

A recent study by Dr. Erez Siniver, chairman of the School of Economics at the College of Management, Academic Studies and Prof. Gil Epstein of Bar-Ilan University, based on Central Bureau of Statistics data from 2010 and comparing data for people with 12 years of schooling or less concludes that Ethiopian immigrants to Israel earn 30%-40% less then Israeli Arabs, until recently occupying the bottom of the scale.

Shetu Yaacov does his best to occupy the protest test whenever he can. He comes on weekends and between work shifts. He was here last week, freezing in the snow, when temperatures in Jerusalem hit zero. He believes it’s important to continuously occupy the protest tent until Ethiopians receive what they are entitled to and is very worried about the eviction order they were served by the Jerusalem Municipality, to be debated in the Jerusalem District court this afternoon.

Shetu details the demands of the protestors. First on their agenda is housing – many are unable to fund rent. They don’t even dream of buying an apartment. They can receive no assistance from their parents who in most cases are worst off. 95% of the working community are exploited by contractors, he explains, in low-pay jobs such as cleaning and security. “The younger generations, those of us who have married and brought children, cannot survive.” Many marriages break up and the people go back to living with their parents. “The government doesn’t care about us. That’s why we’re here. They close us in ghettos and isolate us from society.”

Second on the agenda is education and schooling; “After thirty years our community is in the country I cannot understand the racism that forces our children to go to separate kindergartens and schools.”

Shetu is frustrated with, what he calls, paralyzing racism, that won’t allow him to work as a social worker with communities other than Ethiopians. Many of his friends cannot get jobs at all. He heard from a young woman who changed her name on a job application so that she could not be identified as Ethiopian. She was summoned for an interview but as soon as she entered the room it was obvious to her she would not get the job.

Suicides are becoming very frequent, Shetu explains with great emotion; “People who have been through the hell of the camps of Gondar, come to Israel, lose hope and kill themselves.”

Shetu Yaacov, 31, explains with great emotion; “People who have been through the hell of the camps of Gondar, come to Israel, lose hope and kill themselves”, outside the Ethiopian protest tent opposite the PM’s residence. Jerusalem, Israel. 6-Mar-2012.

“My personal situation is relatively good. Others have lost hope” he summarizes.

Leave a comment

Filed under art, documentary, image, israel, Jerusalem, photo, photographer, photography, photojournalism, photos

Pre-Jerusalem International Marathon Press Conference

Jerusalem Mayor Nir Barkat leads a press conference on the rooftop of Notre Dame Hotel regarding the upcoming second Jerusalem International Marathon explaining the routes, logistics, special benefits to runners and city residents. Jerusalem, Israel. 6-Mar-2012.

Jerusalem Mayor Nir Barkat leads a press conference on the rooftop of Notre Dame Hotel regarding the upcoming second Jerusalem International Marathon explaining the routes, logistics, special benefits to runners and city residents. Jerusalem, Israel. 6-Mar-2012.

Jerusalem Mayor Nir Barkat (R) and Itzchak Lari (L), Deputy GM of Toto Winner, a major marathon sponsor, release helium filled balloons to the sky following a press conference regarding the upcoming second Jerusalem International Marathon. Jerusalem, Israel. 6-Mar-2012.

A view of the Dome of The Rock from the Notre Dame Hotel rooftop as Jerusalem Mayor Nir Barkat leads a press conference regarding the upcoming second Jerusalem International Marathon. Jerusalem, Israel. 6-Mar-2012.

Leave a comment

Filed under art, documentary, image, israel, Jerusalem, photo, photographer, photography, photojournalism, photos