Tag Archives: boys

Demonstrators demand “Draft For All” – Jerusalem

Gavriel "Gabi" Ashkenazi, former Chief of General Staff of IDF, addresses audience at “Draft For All” campaign opposite PM’s office and says: “Serving our country is a great privilege and we are not suckers for doing so!” Jerusalem, Israel. 21-Apr-2012.

Geulah Cohen, former Irgun and Lehi member, politician, and journalist, addresses audience at “Draft For All” campaign opposite PM’s office demanding distribution of burden of mandatory military service, or equivalent, to include ultra-Orthodox. Jerusalem, Israel. 21-Apr-2012.

Demonstrator at renewal of “Draft For All” campaign opposite PM’s office holds an Israeli flag and wears a sticker calling for equal distribution of burden of mandatory military service. Jerusalem, Israel. 21-Apr-2012.

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Volunteer Work on ‘Good Deeds Day’ – Jerusalem

Female IDF soldier of the Shachar Battalion paints the hallways of old residential buildings on Stern Street in Kiryat Yovel on 'Good Deeds Day'. Jerusalem, Israel. 20-Mar-2012.

Boys of Al-Fak School in the Arab neighborhood of Tsur Baher decorate schoolyard on 'Good Deeds Day' as Municipality participates in a national project that encourages work for the community. Jerusalem, Israel. 20-Mar-2012.

Mayor Nir Barkat and businesswoman and philanthropist Shari Arison plant a tree in a community garden on Stern Street in Kiryat Yovel on ‘Good Deeds Day'. Jerusalem, Israel. 20-Mar-2012.

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Deaf and Hearing Impaired Hear the Book of Esther – Jerusalem

Mayor Nir Barkat addresses the audience in a special Purim reading of the Book of Esther for the deaf and hearing-impaired at Bet Zusman using special amplifiers, visual projection and simultaneous sign language translation. Jerusalem, Israel. 8-Mar-2012.

 

Purim celebrators are viewed through the eyes of a mask as they assemble at Bet-Zusman for a special Purim reading of the Book of Esther for the deaf and hearing-impaired with special amplifiers, visual projection sign language translation. Jerusalem, Israel. 8-Mar-2012.

Mayor Nir Barkat takes part in a special Purim reading of the Book of Esther for the deaf and hearing-impaired at Bet Zusman, as special amplifiers are used, visual projection on screen and simultaneous sign language translation. Jerusalem, Israel. 8-Mar-2012.

Mayor Nir Barkat shakes the hand of a boy in a race car driver costume in a special Purim reading of the Book of Esther for the deaf and hearing-impaired at Bet Zusman using special amplifiers, visual projection and simultaneous sign language translation. Jerusalem, Israel. 8-Mar-2012.

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Purim Celebrations in Jerusalem

Purim, which commemorates the events described in the Book of Esther, mainly the foiling of the plot by anti-Semitic Haman, Grand Vizier of the Persian Empire, to massacre the Jews, is celebrated in carnivals and costumes.

A figure of Haman hangs ‘to death’ from an eighth story balcony, symbolizing Haman’s destiny as described in the Book of Esther, following his foiled attempt to massacre the Jews of Persia, as Purim is celebrated in the city. Jerusalem, Israel. 8-Mar-2012.

Excerpt from Government Press Office press release, 5-Mar-2012:

Purim commemorates the events described in the Book of Esther. In Esther 3:8, the anti-Semitic Haman, Grand Vizier of the Persian Empire, tells Persian King Ahasuerus that, “There is a certain people scattered abroad and dispersed among all the peoples… in your kingdom. Their laws are different from those of every people, neither do they keep the king’s laws. Therefore, it does the king no profit to suffer them. If it please the king, let it be written that they be destroyed…” Thus, Haman coined one of the most infamous anti-Semitic canards: That the Jews are a clannish and alien people who do not obey the laws of the land. At Haman’s contrivance, a decree is then issued for all Jews in the Persian Empire to be massacred. But, as the Book of Esther subsequently relates, Haman’s plot was foiled and, “The Jews had light and gladness, and joy and honor…a feast and a good day.” (8:16-17)

Purim, which commemorates the events described in the Book of Esther, mainly the foiling of the plot by anti-Semitic Haman, Grand Vizier of the Persian Empire, to massacre the Jews, is celebrated in carnivals and costumes. Jerusalem, Israel. 8-Mar-2012.

Throughout the centuries, Purim – which celebrates the miraculous salvation of the Jews and the thwarting of Haman’s genocidal plot – has traditionally symbolized the victory of the Jewish people over anti-Semitic tyranny. As such, Purim is a happy, carnival-like holiday.

After sunset Wednesday evening, 7 March, festive prayers will take place in synagogues, where the Book of Esther will also be read aloud. It is customary for people, especially children, to come to synagogue dressed in costume. During the reading of the Book of Esther, whenever Haman’s name is mentioned, congregants traditionally make as much noise as possible in order to drown out his name – a reflection of God’s promise (Exodus 17:14) to, “blot out,” the Amalekite nation, of which Haman was a descendant; special Purim noisemakers may be used for this purpose. The Book of Esther will be read again during morning prayers on Thursday, 8 March. A special Purim prayer is inserted into the daily prayers and the blessing after meals.

A boy wears a Smurf costume on Purim, celebrated as a happy, carnival-like holiday, commemorating the events described in the Book of Esther and the foiled plot of Haman, Grand Vizier of the Persian Empire, to massacre the Jews. Jerusalem, Israel. 8-Mar-2012.

On Purim, Jews are enjoined by the Book of Esther (9:22) to send gifts of food to each other, make special contributions to the poor, and have a festive holiday meal in the afternoon. To this end, the day is also marked by collections for various charities, and by people visiting neighbors and friends to deliver baskets of food, prominent among which are small, three-cornered, fruit-filled pastries known as Oznei Haman in Hebrew (Haman’s ears) or Hamantaschen in Yiddish (Haman’s pockets).

A young boy wears an IDF paratroopers costume on Purim, celebrated as a happy, carnival-like holiday, commemorating the events described in the Book of Esther and the foiled plot of Haman, Grand Vizier of the Persian Empire, to massacre the Jews. Jerusalem, Israel. 8-Mar-2012.

In Jerusalem, Purim is ordinarily celebrated one day later than it is in the rest of the world; accordingly, all Purim-related observances are postponed by one day. This practice originates from the fact that an extra day was prescribed for the Jews of Shushan (the modern Susa, one of the Persian Empire’s four capitals) to defend themselves against their enemies. This second day is known as Shushan Purim. As mentioned in the Book of Esther itself (9:16-19), Jews living in walled cities (later defined by rabbinical authorities to mean walled cities at the time that Joshua entered the Land of Israel) celebrate Purim one day later than Jews living in unwalled cities. There are several such cities in Israel where Shushan Purim is celebrated. In some cities whose status is in doubt, the Book of Esther will actually be read on both days.

Two IDF soldiers look up to a clown on stilts on Purim, celebrated as a happy, carnival-like holiday, commemorating the events described in the Book of Esther and the foiled plot of Haman, Grand Vizier of the Persian Empire, to massacre the Jews. Jerusalem, Israel. 8-Mar-2012.

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Bedouin Market Day – Beersheba

Every Thursday Bedouins and others congregate for Bedouin Market Day continuing a long tradition that has positioned Beersheba as the central place of commerce for Bedouins of the Negev Desert. Beersheba, Israel. 26th January 2012.

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Speak to us of children!

First, there are the children of Sheikh Jarrah …

And then there are the adults …

And a whoman who held a babe against her bosom said,
– Speak to us of children!

And he said:
They are the sons and daughters of Life’s longing for itself.
They come trough you but not from you,
And though they are with you yet they belong not to you.
You may give them your love but not your thoughts,
For they have their own thoughts.
You may house their bodies but not their souls,
For their souls dwell in the house of to-narrow,
which you cannot visit, not even in your dreams.
You may strive to be like them,
but seek not to make them like you.
For life goes not backward nor tarries with yesterday.

You are the bows from which your children as living arrows are sent forth.
The archer sees the mark upon the path of the infinite,
and He bends you with His might that His arrows may go swift and far.
Let your bending in the Archer’s hand be for gladness;
For even as He loves the arrow that flies,
so He loves also the bow that is stable.

Kahlil Gibran, The Prophet

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Boys

A young Jewish boy holds an Israeli flag at a counter-demonstration in Sheikh Jarrah, East Jerusalem

A young Palestinian boy tries to understand what Israeli flags are doing in his neighborhood of Sheikh Jarrah

As the two young boys confront each other, for just a split second, frustration and anger form a raised fist in an act of retaliation with no real intent

29/1/2009, Jerusalem – Violence, dozens of arrests and claims of police brutality have characterized the last few weeks in Sheikh Jarrah, every Friday, following weekly rallies protesting Palestinian eviction from homes and the takeover of these homes by Jewish settlers. Today, police seemed embarrassed and more hesitant in their dealings with ‘unruly’ Arabs and leftist protesters.
Yesterday, January 28, Justice Gad Erenberg of the Jerusalem Magistrate’s Court, rejected police request to extend the remand of those arrested for disorderly conduct last week, January 22, until the end of legal proceedings, and ruled that leftist demonstrations in Sheikh Jarrah are not illegal as claimed by the police. The judge wrote, “Because freedom of assembly and freedom of expression are basic rights, the police must protect those who assemble from others and not declare their gathering as illegal because they fear retaliation from others.” He further stated that the gatherings are legal as long as protesters do not disturb public order or disrupt traffic. The judge noted that according to eyewitness accounts, the protesters yelled at worshipers and even spat at one of them. From that moment on, the judge said, the gathering became illegal and therefore the arrests made afterwards were legitimate.
Turnout today was greater than previous weeks. Several hundred activists assembled carrying signs reading “Free Sheikh Jarrah”, “Stop Apartheid”, “There is no holiness in an occupied city” and “Eviction from homes hurts”. Across the street several right-wing activists staged a counter demonstration. The atmosphere was joyful but tense as both sides awaited police reaction. But, as the sun sank in the West, the serenity of the Sabbath overcame politics and all involved disperssed very quietly.

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